WYSONG COMPANION ANIMAL HEALTH LETTER
Dr. R. L. Wysong
March 1997
 
 
DEAR FRIEND:

     The focus of modern conventional medicine is not health.  It is disease.  The term “health care” used by most veterinarians and physicians really means “disease care.”  Similarly, the word “prevention” really has been twisted to mean vaccines, laboratory tests, and regular checkups rather than you taking control over lifestyle and environmental and nutritional choices.  Prevention also means seeking optimal physical, emotional, metabolic and cognitive health. 
      Furthermore, once a disease has been identified and labeled - which is the pre-eminent focus of modern medicine - and interventions are introduced such as pharmaceuticals and surgery to quell the symptoms, by and large the true cause of the disease is never addressed.  The smoke detector alarm is turned off while the fire continues to smolder in the closet.
      If you want true, lasting, optimal health to your full genetic capacity, this is not the approach you should take (nor allow yourself to be buffaloed into).
      Many Wysong Diet users often write to us giving us a variety of laboratory values from tests they have had performed on their pet, and ask that we make a recommendation based on these.  When faced with a client who came to me with such values and asking for a second opinion, my first inclination was to look at the animal.  I could care less what the laboratory values are if the animal looks healthy, acts healthy, has bright eyes and glossy hair, is eating well, and has normal elimination habits.  When I would see such a robust animal, I would tell the client to ignore the laboratory values.  However, this usually was not satisfactory.  Many people are just so infatuated with medical technology that they are sure something must be “wrong” with their pet if the laboratory test says so.  So they scurry off to another veterinarian who will “do something” about it.
     Well-intentioned pet owners believe that if testing cholesterol, blood pressure, urinalyses, mammograms, blood tests and PSA prostate tests save lives in humans, then certainly similar testing would help save the life of their pet.  But in actual fact, not only is there no proof that these tests extend or save the lives of humans, there is even evidence that by submitting yourself to them you may cause intervention that is unnecessary and thus put yourself at risk. 
     I know this sounds outlandish because “everyone knows” for example, that “high cholesterol causes heart disease.”  But this is just a medical sound byte.  Cholesterol, in fact, does not cause heart disease and lowering it with drugs can put you at risk of suicide and cancer.  (For a more thorough discussion of how tests do not do what they are marketed for, see the Wysong Health Letter Index.)
     Additionally, consider that tests are subject to machine and human error.  Results of tests can vary with the emotional state of the animal, the time of the day, when a meal was eaten, what the nature of the meal was, the method by which the sample was obtained, and how it was stored or transported.  There is a margin of error allowed in some clinical laboratory equipment that is sufficiently large to make the difference between whether your test is normal or abnormal, requiring perhaps dramatic intervention with pharmaceuticals and other treatments that have a whole range of potential side effects.  I have discussed this inadequacy of clinical laboratory testing and the rampant errors that occur in previous issues of the Wysong Health Letter for humans, but the implications for animal testings are just as valid.
     This is not to say that clinical laboratory testing cannot be a useful adjunct when overt illness strikes.  It can give clinicians some general direction about the course of therapy that should be taken, and a general indication of the progression of disease or healing.
     But the goal of medicine should not be to treat laboratory results.  Rather, it should be to restore lifestyle and nutrition to optimize the opportunity for health and healing.
     Follow the complete Wysong Feeding-For-Health Program (see page 4) and you will be doing the very best you can to give your pet the best opportunity for preventing disease, or shortening it should it strike.  Also, believe what you see in your animal before you believe any laboratory test that is supposedly revealing some hidden illness.
 
 
SUDDEN CARDIAC DEATH
     In a recent scientific report in a leading veterinary journal, 54 cases of sudden cardiac death or congestive heart failure were studied.  Sudden cardiac death in Doberman Pinschers with cardiomyopathy (a degeneration of heart muscle) can occur before or after there are actual signs of heart problems.  Abnormalities are usually seen in dogs at 3-4 years old.  Then the disease progresses to sudden death or congestive heart failure (the heart loses its strength and fluid can accumulate in the lungs and body cavities).  This almost always occurs within about 4 years.
     It is interesting to note that this condition in Dobermans was not reported until about the mid-1940’s.   Although it can be genetically linked to particular lines of Dobermans, I believe there is reason to suspect that nutrition may be causative, or, if there is a genetic predisposition, it may trigger and exacerbate the problem.  It was about in the 1940’s as well that so called “100% complete and balanced” diets were created and people en masse jumped on the bandwagon.
     True, I may be speculating here a little,  but there is compelling reason to believe that the majority of the degenerative conditions facing both humans and animals are a direct result of veering from the natural, whole, raw food course for which we are genetically programmed.
      Remember, thousands of cats fed premium brands of “100% complete and balanced” foods developed dilated cardiomyopathy and this was later discovered to be due to a deficiency of the amino acid  taurine in these “complete and balanced” diets.    Processing by its very nature destroys, or at the least greatly diminishes, the nutritional value of foods.  That is why all Wysong Diets are boosted by live nutrients post-processing. 
      Humans and animals need a host of nutrients for the heart to function properly, including certain amino acids such as taurine and carnitine, coenzyme Q-10, magnesium, and vitamins E and C.   Raw meats and organs are rich sources of these nutrients but pets (and humans of course) have a diet that can be virtually devoid of these foods.
      Folks, I know it sounds like a broken record, but I can’t emphasize to you enough to begin supplementing fresh whole foods to your pet's diet.  Read the Feeding-For-Health Program on page 4 and be sure to introduce your naturally carnivorous pets, as soon as they are weaned, to fresh meats and organs (do not trim fat).  This is a critical key to help prevent the development of the host of degenerative disease conditions which can afflict them in later life.

(To assist specifically in providing the appropriate nutrients for heart function, we have almost completed an NSF formula which will contain the spectrum of important nutrients known to affect the health and metabolism of the heart).
          Reference: 2
 
FITNESS AND LIFE EXTENSION
     Over 30, 000 men and women were examined at the Cooper Clinic in Dallas, Texas between the years of 1970 and 1989.  A baseline of physical fitness was determined by treadmill analysis and physical activity was self-reported.   The participants averaged about 33 years of age and were followed for approximately 8 years.  After adjusting carefully for all the variables such as smoking or pre-existing disease, it was found that there was a strong inverse relationship between death from all causes (including heart disease and cancer) and level of physical fitness.  In other words, the more fit we are, the better chance we have of living a life free from disease.
     Consider that in our natural setting every day would require substantial physical activity to obtain food and ensure safety and shelter.  Our modern, cocooned, sedentary life is just not what our bodies are meant to be doing.
     Similarly, pets would even be more active in their natural environmental context.  To create a cushy, inactive, three- squares-a-day life of leisure for our companion animals may be done out of love, but this lifestyle condemns them to the same degenerative conditions we have.  Walk, jog and play with your pets.  Be creative every day in devising ways to keep them active, and you too will enjoy the benefits of better fitness.
          Reference:
                    Ann Epidemiol, 1996;6:452-457      
 
EAR BUGS
     If your pet, you or your children get caught with a bug in the ear canal, here is a technique to remove it.   In a very dark room, shine a flashlight into the ear canal, holding the light about a foot from the ear.  After a minute or two the bug will invariably move out of the ear canal into the light.  If a dark room is not available, cover the victim with a coat or blanket and do the same thing.
 
TREATING POISON IVY AND POISON OAK
     If your pet’s exposed belly comes in contact with poison ivy or poison oak, or you do, open up some capsules of Wysong Mega C and mix with a small amount of water to form a paste.  Apply this to the skin and at the same time take one capsule of Wysong Mega C four times a day.  The problem will normally disappear within 24 hours.
 
SOAP IN THE EYES
     Researchers have shown that the common surfactant, sodium lauryl sulfate, is toxic in the eyes.   This compound is used throughout the soap and cosmetic industry and is the base for almost all shampoos and soaps used for humans or animals.  In the young, particularly, the compound can remain in the eyes for several days, disrupting proteins.   If there is any injury or infection in the conjunctiva or cornea of the eye, getting this compound in the eye will significantly delay healing and may even promote more serious complications.
This is one of the reasons the various Wysong shampoos were developed with nontoxic and more mild natural ingredients and cleansing agents.
 
CHEESE FOR THE TEETH
     If you or your pet are having trouble with the build- up of plaque on the teeth with resultant periodontitis (inflammation of the gum tissue at the base of the teeth), consider eating a small snack of cheddar, Swiss, or Monteray Jack cheese after meals.            For an as yet not fully understood reason, these cheeses have an ability to neutralize the acids produced by the bacteria within plaque.  
     Additionally, consider the use of our newly developed Wysong Healthy Toothpowder™.  This new product has a variety of natural ingredients that have been proven through research to retard the buildup of plaque, prevent dental caries, freshen the breath, remineralize teeth, and encourage healthy probiotic-type cultures in the mouth.  Unlike most commercial products containing a variety of chemicals including toxins such as fluorides, Wysong Healthy Toothpowder™ has been designed to be edible.  Thus it may not only be used to brush your teeth or the teeth of your pet, but can be used as a convenient mouthwash or mouthrinse after meals without fear that potentially harmful chemicals are being consumed.
          Reference:
                    American Dental Association 84;4:31-47
 
FEMALE HAIR
     The development of excess hair in women (hirsutism) can be idiopathic (of unknown cause) or caused by hormonal problems such as with polycystic ovary syndrome.  Although there are drugs available that can help with this problem, they carry with them a variety of dangerous side effects.  These drugs act by inhibiting the activity of the enzyme 5 alpha-reductase, which is responsible for converting the hormone testosterone into dihydrotestosterone.
     Extract of saw palmetto (Serenona repens) also has been shown to inhibit 5 alpha-reductase, but without dangerous side effects.  This activity from saw palmetto is also responsible for its effectiveness in treating men with prostatic disease.  If not available locally, contact Resource 4 below.
          Reference:
                    The Healthy Alternatives Store Catalog, available from 1880 N. Eastman Rd., Midland, MI  48642, (517) 631-0009.
 
SHARK CARTILAGE AND CANCER
     Although there has been much promotion of shark cartilage as a cancer treatment, the clinical evidence has not come in.  The argument goes that since “sharks don’t get cancer” and shark cartilage has been shown to decrease angiogenesis (the development of blood vessels necessary to feed cancer growth), that therefore the product would be useful in cancer therapy.            One company that manufacturers the cartilage submitted the product to an FDA supervised clinical trial to evaluate this treatment for cancer.  The company withdrew from the study when it was found that there was no scientific data to support its effectiveness in advanced cancer patients.  Evidently they all died or significantly worsened.
     Cancer is a complex phenomenon that is a result of a variety of lifestyle choices and contacts that occur over many years.  The best approach is prevention and the best treatment is restoration of lifestyle to its archetypal form.  (See Wysong Health Letter Vol. 10, No. 9, and others listed in the Wysong Health Letter Index, for a thorough discussion of the causes and solutions to cancer.)
 
IRON AND HEARING LOSS
     Although pets may receive iron supplements by way of the vitamin/mineral premixes added to commercial pet foods, deficiency may still result.  Supplemental iron is not nearly as efficient in raising blood levels of iron as is the iron found within the natural prey meat meals of carnivorous pets.  Over time iron deficiency can result in a loss of hearing.  Be sure you are following the Wysong Feeding-For-Health Program and regularly supplementing fresh meats, including red meats, to Wysong Diets.  (Iron deficiency has also been linked to hearing loss in humans and a similar remedy would work.)
          Reference:
                    ORL 87;49:118-122

Dr. R. L. Wysong
March 1997
 

DEAR FRIEND:

     The focus of modern conventional medicine is not health.  It is disease.  The term “health care” used by most veterinarians and physicians really means “disease care.”  Similarly, the word “prevention” really has been twisted to mean vaccines, laboratory tests, and regular checkups rather than you taking control over lifestyle and environmental and nutritional choices.  Prevention also means seeking optimal physical, emotional, metabolic and cognitive health. 
      Furthermore, once a disease has been identified and labeled - which is the pre-eminent focus of modern medicine - and interventions are introduced such as pharmaceuticals and surgery to quell the symptoms, by and large the true cause of the disease is never addressed.  The smoke detector alarm is turned off while the fire continues to smolder in the closet.
      If you want true, lasting, optimal health to your full genetic capacity, this is not the approach you should take (nor allow yourself to be buffaloed into).
      Many Wysong Diet users often write to us giving us a variety of laboratory values from tests they have had performed on their pet, and ask that we make a recommendation based on these.  When faced with a client who came to me with such values and asking for a second opinion, my first inclination was to look at the animal.  I could care less what the laboratory values are if the animal looks healthy, acts healthy, has bright eyes and glossy hair, is eating well, and has normal elimination habits.  When I would see such a robust animal, I would tell the client to ignore the laboratory values.  However, this usually was not satisfactory.  Many people are just so infatuated with medical technology that they are sure something must be “wrong” with their pet if the laboratory test says so.  So they scurry off to another veterinarian who will “do something” about it.
     Well-intentioned pet owners believe that if testing cholesterol, blood pressure, urinalyses, mammograms, blood tests and PSA prostate tests save lives in humans, then certainly similar testing would help save the life of their pet.  But in actual fact, not only is there no proof that these tests extend or save the lives of humans, there is even evidence that by submitting yourself to them you may cause intervention that is unnecessary and thus put yourself at risk. 
     I know this sounds outlandish because “everyone knows” for example, that “high cholesterol causes heart disease.”  But this is just a medical sound byte.  Cholesterol, in fact, does not cause heart disease and lowering it with drugs can put you at risk of suicide and cancer.  (For a more thorough discussion of how tests do not do what they are marketed for, see the Wysong Health Letter Index.)
     Additionally, consider that tests are subject to machine and human error.  Results of tests can vary with the emotional state of the animal, the time of the day, when a meal was eaten, what the nature of the meal was, the method by which the sample was obtained, and how it was stored or transported.  There is a margin of error allowed in some clinical laboratory equipment that is sufficiently large to make the difference between whether your test is normal or abnormal, requiring perhaps dramatic intervention with pharmaceuticals and other treatments that have a whole range of potential side effects.  I have discussed this inadequacy of clinical laboratory testing and the rampant errors that occur in previous issues of the Wysong Health Letter for humans, but the implications for animal testings are just as valid.
     This is not to say that clinical laboratory testing cannot be a useful adjunct when overt illness strikes.  It can give clinicians some general direction about the course of therapy that should be taken, and a general indication of the progression of disease or healing.
     But the goal of medicine should not be to treat laboratory results.  Rather, it should be to restore lifestyle and nutrition to optimize the opportunity for health and healing.
     Follow the complete Wysong Feeding-For-Health Program (see page 4) and you will be doing the very best you can to give your pet the best opportunity for preventing disease, or shortening it should it strike.  Also, believe what you see in your animal before you believe any laboratory test that is supposedly revealing some hidden illness.
 
 
SUDDEN CARDIAC DEATH
     In a recent scientific report in a leading veterinary journal, 54 cases of sudden cardiac death or congestive heart failure were studied.  Sudden cardiac death in Doberman Pinschers with cardiomyopathy (a degeneration of heart muscle) can occur before or after there are actual signs of heart problems.  Abnormalities are usually seen in dogs at 3-4 years old.  Then the disease progresses to sudden death or congestive heart failure (the heart loses its strength and fluid can accumulate in the lungs and body cavities).  This almost always occurs within about 4 years.
     It is interesting to note that this condition in Dobermans was not reported until about the mid-1940’s.   Although it can be genetically linked to particular lines of Dobermans, I believe there is reason to suspect that nutrition may be causative, or, if there is a genetic predisposition, it may trigger and exacerbate the problem.  It was about in the 1940’s as well that so called “100% complete and balanced” diets were created and people en masse jumped on the bandwagon.
     True, I may be speculating here a little,  but there is compelling reason to believe that the majority of the degenerative conditions facing both humans and animals are a direct result of veering from the natural, whole, raw food course for which we are genetically programmed.
      Remember, thousands of cats fed premium brands of “100% complete and balanced” foods developed dilated cardiomyopathy and this was later discovered to be due to a deficiency of the amino acid  taurine in these “complete and balanced” diets.    Processing by its very nature destroys, or at the least greatly diminishes, the nutritional value of foods.  That is why all Wysong Diets are boosted by live nutrients post-processing. 
      Humans and animals need a host of nutrients for the heart to function properly, including certain amino acids such as taurine and carnitine, coenzyme Q-10, magnesium, and vitamins E and C.   Raw meats and organs are rich sources of these nutrients but pets (and humans of course) have a diet that can be virtually devoid of these foods.
      Folks, I know it sounds like a broken record, but I can’t emphasize to you enough to begin supplementing fresh whole foods to your pet's diet.  Read the Feeding-For-Health Program on page 4 and be sure to introduce your naturally carnivorous pets, as soon as they are weaned, to fresh meats and organs (do not trim fat).  This is a critical key to help prevent the development of the host of degenerative disease conditions which can afflict them in later life.

(To assist specifically in providing the appropriate nutrients for heart function, we have almost completed an NSF formula which will contain the spectrum of important nutrients known to affect the health and metabolism of the heart).
          Reference: 2
 
FITNESS AND LIFE EXTENSION
     Over 30, 000 men and women were examined at the Cooper Clinic in Dallas, Texas between the years of 1970 and 1989.  A baseline of physical fitness was determined by treadmill analysis and physical activity was self-reported.   The participants averaged about 33 years of age and were followed for approximately 8 years.  After adjusting carefully for all the variables such as smoking or pre-existing disease, it was found that there was a strong inverse relationship between death from all causes (including heart disease and cancer) and level of physical fitness.  In other words, the more fit we are, the better chance we have of living a life free from disease.
     Consider that in our natural setting every day would require substantial physical activity to obtain food and ensure safety and shelter.  Our modern, cocooned, sedentary life is just not what our bodies are meant to be doing.
     Similarly, pets would even be more active in their natural environmental context.  To create a cushy, inactive, three- squares-a-day life of leisure for our companion animals may be done out of love, but this lifestyle condemns them to the same degenerative conditions we have.  Walk, jog and play with your pets.  Be creative every day in devising ways to keep them active, and you too will enjoy the benefits of better fitness.
          Reference:
                    Ann Epidemiol, 1996;6:452-457      
 
EAR BUGS
     If your pet, you or your children get caught with a bug in the ear canal, here is a technique to remove it.   In a very dark room, shine a flashlight into the ear canal, holding the light about a foot from the ear.  After a minute or two the bug will invariably move out of the ear canal into the light.  If a dark room is not available, cover the victim with a coat or blanket and do the same thing.
 
TREATING POISON IVY AND POISON OAK
     If your pet’s exposed belly comes in contact with poison ivy or poison oak, or you do, open up some capsules of Wysong Mega C and mix with a small amount of water to form a paste.  Apply this to the skin and at the same time take one capsule of Wysong Mega C four times a day.  The problem will normally disappear within 24 hours.
 
SOAP IN THE EYES
     Researchers have shown that the common surfactant, sodium lauryl sulfate, is toxic in the eyes.   This compound is used throughout the soap and cosmetic industry and is the base for almost all shampoos and soaps used for humans or animals.  In the young, particularly, the compound can remain in the eyes for several days, disrupting proteins.   If there is any injury or infection in the conjunctiva or cornea of the eye, getting this compound in the eye will significantly delay healing and may even promote more serious complications.
This is one of the reasons the various Wysong shampoos were developed with nontoxic and more mild natural ingredients and cleansing agents.
 
CHEESE FOR THE TEETH
     If you or your pet are having trouble with the build- up of plaque on the teeth with resultant periodontitis (inflammation of the gum tissue at the base of the teeth), consider eating a small snack of cheddar, Swiss, or Monteray Jack cheese after meals.            For an as yet not fully understood reason, these cheeses have an ability to neutralize the acids produced by the bacteria within plaque.  
     Additionally, consider the use of our newly developed Wysong Healthy Toothpowder™.  This new product has a variety of natural ingredients that have been proven through research to retard the buildup of plaque, prevent dental caries, freshen the breath, remineralize teeth, and encourage healthy probiotic-type cultures in the mouth.  Unlike most commercial products containing a variety of chemicals including toxins such as fluorides, Wysong Healthy Toothpowder™ has been designed to be edible.  Thus it may not only be used to brush your teeth or the teeth of your pet, but can be used as a convenient mouthwash or mouthrinse after meals without fear that potentially harmful chemicals are being consumed.
          Reference:
                    American Dental Association 84;4:31-47
 
FEMALE HAIR
     The development of excess hair in women (hirsutism) can be idiopathic (of unknown cause) or caused by hormonal problems such as with polycystic ovary syndrome.  Although there are drugs available that can help with this problem, they carry with them a variety of dangerous side effects.  These drugs act by inhibiting the activity of the enzyme 5 alpha-reductase, which is responsible for converting the hormone testosterone into dihydrotestosterone.
     Extract of saw palmetto (Serenona repens) also has been shown to inhibit 5 alpha-reductase, but without dangerous side effects.  This activity from saw palmetto is also responsible for its effectiveness in treating men with prostatic disease.  If not available locally, contact Resource 4 below.
          Reference:
                    The Healthy Alternatives Store Catalog, available from 1880 N. Eastman Rd., Midland, MI  48642, (517) 631-0009.
 
SHARK CARTILAGE AND CANCER
     Although there has been much promotion of shark cartilage as a cancer treatment, the clinical evidence has not come in.  The argument goes that since “sharks don’t get cancer” and shark cartilage has been shown to decrease angiogenesis (the development of blood vessels necessary to feed cancer growth), that therefore the product would be useful in cancer therapy.            One company that manufacturers the cartilage submitted the product to an FDA supervised clinical trial to evaluate this treatment for cancer.  The company withdrew from the study when it was found that there was no scientific data to support its effectiveness in advanced cancer patients.  Evidently they all died or significantly worsened.
     Cancer is a complex phenomenon that is a result of a variety of lifestyle choices and contacts that occur over many years.  The best approach is prevention and the best treatment is restoration of lifestyle to its archetypal form.  (See Wysong Health Letter Vol. 10, No. 9, and others listed in the Wysong Health Letter Index, for a thorough discussion of the causes and solutions to cancer.)
 
IRON AND HEARING LOSS
     Although pets may receive iron supplements by way of the vitamin/mineral premixes added to commercial pet foods, deficiency may still result.  Supplemental iron is not nearly as efficient in raising blood levels of iron as is the iron found within the natural prey meat meals of carnivorous pets.  Over time iron deficiency can result in a loss of hearing.  Be sure you are following the Wysong Feeding-For-Health Program and regularly supplementing fresh meats, including red meats, to Wysong Diets.  (Iron deficiency has also been linked to hearing loss in humans and a similar remedy would work.)
          Reference:
                    ORL 87;49:118-122